Thursday, 23 March 2017

Schrodinger's pish stick

I've been getting sick in the mornings. I know, I know, that this is from the progesterone more than anything else. But still, at 3 days post transfer, I cracked and decided to pee on a stick. It was negative.

I hate the waiting. I don't think I've ever had a cycle where a negative turned out to be a positive a few days later.

And, I don't know if this is just because I'm getting a bit older - although not, apparently, any wiser about early testing - but the drugs feel awful this time around. In addition to the weeping I'm also getting spots everywhere - my face, my scalp... urgh.

But at the moment I am neither pregnant nor not pregnant.

I've also been arguing with my husband a lot. He's been preoccupied with lots of other things, which we've been talking about more than the cycle. But I'm getting really fucked off with him hiding upstairs on his computer while I sit downstairs with a thumping headache, fielding questions about trains and atoms from the Boy.

Tonight's row was at dinnertime, because I was trying to put together a plan B if this cycle doesn't work. I find this is immensely helpful. It means if the cycle doesn't work I'm not totally pulling myself up off the floor, I've got something positive to focus on. Normally it involves booking a holiday or, more generally, having something lined up to look forward to.

So I was talking to him about holidays and generally trying to make myself feel like it wouldn't be quite so shit if this cycle doesn't pan out, and then he came out with "Oh, but it might still work this time".

I felt like stabbing him with my fork.

I think his point of view is that the drugs are driving me up the wall, that we're maybe doing this too soon after the miscarriage and we need a good long break after this cycle. And that we're going to a kiddie theme park near a big post-industrial city in a few weeks so I should be content.

Mine is that the drugs are making me feel like shit, but in order to cope with this I need him to be a bit more supportive and actually come up with plans and suggestions that aren't as a result of me prodding him. I am not getting any younger, I hate the limbo of treatments, and I need a more definite timescale for career purposes, and, more importantly, the more you can ignore the emotional trauma and just do cycles the more likely it is that IVF will work. And yes, a break would be nice but it needs to be something a bit more life affirming than what we've got planned so far.


Monday, 20 March 2017

Transfer day

I have been weeping since I started progesterone. It'll take something relatively small to start it off, but once it starts, I can't stop.

I also feel absolutely foul. I have that horrible hair-sticky-up, too-hot, bad-tempered feeling that's similar to very bad PMT. I couldn't wear makeup to the clinic and my face looks like corned beef.

Despite all of this, I thought it would work out fine if I drove myself to the clinic because we couldn't get childcare.

We didn't want to ask my parents as to be honest, driving myself up was less stressful than explaining to them. They had, coincidentally, tried to invite themselves over today to drop off a toy the Boy had left there at the weekend, but I said it was a bad time as we'd be out.

The drive involves going along the motorway and then taking a complicated route around the edges of the city centre. I was feeling relatively pleased with myself when I managed to get there without going the wrong way once.

I started crying when I got into the fucking clinic, and then I was sort of low level sniffling for most of the time I was there.

To make matters worse, I used to get a weird twitch in my leg when I was giving presentations at work. This stopped a few years ago.

But when I was in the stirrups and had the catheter in, my fucking leg started trembling. I'm not consciously doing it so I can't stop doing it either.

I hate my leg. Fuck sake, leg, letting the side down.

The staff didn't mention the weird shaky leg thing but they were like "Aha! You've stopped crying" a couple of times. Which immediately set me off again.

When I set off for home, I went the wrong way straight away. So I had to double back.

Then a roundabout appeared when I didn't expect it and I realised I had was somehow driving into the city centre rather than onto the motorway.

Finally, I got back onto the right route and decided it would be a good idea to stop at a shopping centre on the way home.

This was a good plan until I couldn't find a parking space and then accidentally drove into another car while looking for one.

Mercifully at low speed and only with slight damage to both cars, but probably not a recommended course of action in any of the books I used to read about increasing one's IVF chances through meditation and eating mung beans.

So, the actual transfer seemed to go pretty well. But I am SO getting my husband to come next time.

When I got home my mum had left the toy in a bag in our back garden, along with, inexplicably, a bottle of chilli sauce.

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Prostap, again

Aside from completely failing to keep up with the 100 books challenge (I started playing the South Park game instead) I went to the clinic and had another prostap injection.

So now, for the fifth time, I'm getting headaches, hot flushes and feeling sleepy. Oh, and fat. All hormonal medication seems to inevitably make me fat. Even 'normal' things like the Pill (which also gave me horrendous thrush... a silver lining of having no tubes is no contraceptives).

This time around, I've been doing far more exercise than I usually do not just when cycling, but generally. Admittedly, this is only partly due to the keeping-fit-for-IVF motivation, it's also because all the mums doing pickup at the Boy's school seem to do some sort of fitness and I didn't want to be fat, unfit parent for the next thirteen years or so.

(Incidentally, I saw figures recently about healthy life expectancy in deprived neighbourhoods vs affluent areas being almost 20 years, so presumably this herding instinct/peer pressure to exercise is part of the reason for that gap).

The exercise is making the side effects less bad, although I don't know if it's just that less sitting around gives me less time to focus on them. Although then I worry I am not doing it properly if there's no side effects.

I'm also wondering how many times it's healthy to go through a fake menopause. I have been assured that there's no long term health effects of multiple IVF treatments.

Is that the truth or does nobody really know yet; wonderful though fertility treatment is, it's a relatively new technology and, as far as I can discern, the drugs regimes are much newer than IVF itself.

But I've got to make the best choices with the information and circumstances that I have, so I am sitting here feeling hot, a wee bit headachey and slightly mad.

Thursday, 2 February 2017

Books and films so far this year...

See post below for an explanation of what I'm doing, but so far this year I have managed to consume...

Lisa Jewell, The Girls - this has been the most "chic lit" thing I've read. I used to really enjoy Lisa Jewell books years ago but hadn't read any for a while. It was good at the start but ended very abruptly, with some very improbable happenings to tie up various subplots.

Asne Seiersad, Bookseller of Kabul - This is a book drawn from the author's experience of living in Kabul after the fall of the Taliban. It's very sad with some initially sympathetic characters turning out to be not so sympathetic. It was like a small window into an Afghan family; any of the stories could have been their own book.

Philippa Gregory, The Virgin's Lover - a book about the scandalous love affair between Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley. The main character was Dudley's wife, Amy. Who is really fucking irritating and, abandoned by her Dudley, turns to the church to find a bloke to tell her what to do, which is to cling onto her husband. I was willing her to grow a spine...

Kazuo Ishiguoro, The Forgetful Giant - One of the disadvantages of doing a reading challenge is that you don't get to reread or really think about books. This book philosophised about the advantages and disadvantages of leaving the past behind and forgetfulness. I did really enjoy it but it was delibarately ambiguous and inconclusive. I think I'll reread it when I'm finished the challenge.

Anne de Courcy, The Fishing Fleet: Husband Hunting in the Raj - This was a history book about young women travelling to British India to marry. It was fascinating and well written, with plenty of anecdotes. However, I'm not entirely convinced the British in India were as straight laced as they'd have you believe, and I'd expected a bit more about the Indian Mutiny and losing the Raj. Very good, though.

Tim Marshall, Prisoners of Geography - A series of essays about geopolitical pressures and conflicts on Earth. Produced last year, I'd love to see an upate this year sometime. Assuming a Twitter inflicted Armageddon doesn't happen before the second edition is printed.

Terry Pratchett, the Shepherd's Crown - I loved Terry Pratchett all through my teens and early 20s, stopped reading for a few years, ordered this and then didn't read it at first. I wish I'd picked it up earlier as he never lost his flare for a moment. He introduces some fantastic new characters and I caught myself looking forward to the next Discworld novel to find out what happens next. Great as a book, bittersweet as a Pratchett fan.

Vicky Bhogal, Cooking with Mummyji  I saw this in a second hand shop and snapped it up as I love British Asian food and I'd meant to buy this when it came out, ages ago. I haven't cooked enough from it to review it as a receipe book but I enjoyed all the anecdotes. Interesting, for all the author makes great play of the matriarchal role in teaching cookery, a lot of the receipes are credited to her Dad.

And a film...

Trainspotting 2 - As mentioned, I don't get to the cinema very often, but everyone went to see this. It wasn't quite as sharp, funny or zeitgeisty as the original, but it was still excellent. The scene in the Orange Lodge was standout, and Begbie is more terrifying with age.

Wednesday, 1 February 2017

The culture project

I read about the 100 books in a year project recently and thought it'd be a good idea to try. I like reading but stuff going on have meant less time on this, and I'd like to rekindle my love of books. I'm a relatively fast reader, a skill the Boy, gratifyingly, seems to be picking up.

However, I know there are going to be dry reading months, and I've decided to make this 100 movies/books year. The reason is I love films almost as much as books but get only a small window at night after the Boy is in bed, or a rare date night, or a kids' film that we all want to go and see at the pictures (cinema or movies to you), to add to the total.

The rules are:

Mostly, any film or book counts to the total.

I will generally discount any kids DVD I wouldn't choose to watch without children (endless Thomas the Tank Engine and similar) or children's films I do find quite entertaining but can recite them backwards (anything featuring the Minions).

I started off this challenge trying to read literary books. This very quickly felt like the worthiest, most middle class project ever. Although I think I'd be failing the challenge if by the end I could say I'd read 100 romance novels, I'm aiming for a mix.

I'm not counting Game of Thrones because I love Game of Thrones and would watch it over and over again, forever. If I ever start watching any of the box sets everyone else raves about then I will probably count that. I will draw up the rules on box sets as I go along, if I have to.

Sunday, 29 January 2017

Gearing up to try again, and clinic woe

So we thought we should go back and see the clinic to talk about the next transfer, and booked an appointment.

We then got a vaguely snotty letter through the post from the clinic saying a consultations cost £130 if you finished treatment more than 2 months ago, or unless you had treatment booked.

I don't mind paying for treatment at all and realise it's reasonable to charge for consultations to discourage timewaster, but this seemed just a bit grabby.

I e-mailed the clinic to explain that the reason we needed an appointment more than 2 months after treatment was that I'd had a miscarriage that got detected at 12 weeks, we had frozen embryos and asking that under the circumstances could they waive the fee.

A few hours later I discovered a voicemail on my phone from one of the nurses apologising for not calling me last month (??? We let the clinic know and they did call us back) and then saying sorry we'd lost our baby and to give her a call on Thursday or Friday.

None of this was very helpful. In practical terms we're going to see the clinic before then anyway and I suspect they'd not read my notes, in emotional terms it kind of temporarily pulled me back to the time around the scan and surgery.

Anyway, on the plus side, we're going to see them. On the minus side, AF hasn't appeared yet and it's six weeks since I had surgery.

Thursday, 29 December 2016

Roll on 2017

Sorry for the absence.

What happened was, I did the IVF cycle and froze everything. I then went off and did the thing that I last blogged about. This all ended up in tears because, y'know, you can't have young (ish) women going around running things and pissing off old men.

So then I got on with IVF. This went swimmingly at first - pregnant on the first go, everything looked fine. I got past the point of all my previous losses and was beginning to relax.

The hcg checks were fine, the 8 week scan was fine, I was being sick everywhere, all good.

Except then I got to my 12 week scan and there was no heartbeat.

So it was all a bit shit.

I then, after a few days, got a surgically managed miscarriage (waiting days was torture, but I've discovered that in some places they make you wait a fortnight, which must be horrendous).

Mentally, I'm not as bad as I was in the olden days after losses. Having the Boy means that things could be a lot worse.

I also think that some of the behaviours learned from previous losses, and I suppose a much lesser expectation that things will be ok, means you've less far to fall.

Some things I had forgotten about though - we've got another two embryos to go and I'd forgotten what a pain in the arse it is not knowing what you're doing from month to month.

But anyway, that's where I am. I hope to be back blogging a bit more regularly but we'll see what happens!